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Middle School Library: MIDDLE SCHOOL LIBRARY

Reading Recommendations!

5th/6th ebook recommendations

 

(image citation: Voegtli, Rosmarie. Reading. 15 July 2011. Flickr, SmugMug+Flickr, www.flickr.com/
     photos/94212497@N00/5940070493. Accessed 23 Nov. 2020.)

7th/8th ebook recommendations

 

(image citation: Madelinetosh. Reading. 31 July 2007. Flickr, SmugMug+Flickr, www.flickr.com/
     photos/51503251@N00/974784929. Accessed 23 Nov. 2020.)

Native American Heritage Month

 

November is National American Indian // Indigenous Peoples Heritage Month

 

"America is a vast land of many cultures dating back thousands of years to the original inhabitants of the land. The history, heritage, and culture of Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians are part of all national parks today. Every November during Native American Heritage Month and throughout the year, the National Park Service and our partners share history and the continuing culture of America’s indigenous peoples."
 

Please scroll through the following slides to see some of the amazing books celebrating Indigenous culture that we have in our Middle School library!

An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States for Young People

Spanning more than 400 years, this classic bottom-up history examines the legacy of Indigenous peoples' resistance, resilience, and steadfast fight against imperialism. Going beyond the story of America as a country "discovered" by a few brave men in the "New World," Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history.

This Place

Explore the past 150 years through the eyes of Indigenous creators in this groundbreaking graphic novel anthology. Beautifully illustrated, these stories are an emotional and enlightening journey through Indigenous wonderworks, psychic battles, and time travel. See how Indigenous peoples have survived a post-apocalyptic world since Contact. This is one of the 200 exceptional projects funded through the Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter initiative.

What the Eagle Sees

What do people do when their civilization is invaded? Indigenous people have been faced with disease, war, broken promises, and forced assimilation. Despite crushing losses and insurmountable challenges, they formed new nations from the remnants of old ones, they adopted new ideas and built on them, they fought back, and they kept their cultures alive. When the only possible "victory" was survival, they survived.
In this brilliant follow up to Turtle Island, esteemed academic Eldon Yellowhorn and award-winning author Kathy Lowinger team up again, this time to tell the stories of what Indigenous people did when invaders arrived on their homelands. What the Eagle Sees shares accounts of the people, places, and events that have mattered in Indigenous history from a vastly under-represented perspective—an Indigenous viewpoint.

Surviving the City

Tasha Spillett's graphic novel debut is a story about womanhood, friendship, colonialism, and the anguish of a missing loved one. Miikwan and Dez are best friends. Miikwan is Anishinaabe; Dez is Inninew. Together, the teens navigate the challenges of growing up in an urban landscape—they're so close, they even completed their Berry Fast together. However, when Dez's grandmother becomes too sick, Dez is told she can't stay with her anymore. With the threat of a group home looming, Dez can't bring herself to go home and disappears. Miikwan is devastated, and the wound of her missing mother resurfaces. Will Dez's community find her before it's too late? Will Miikwan be able to cope if they don't?

The Birchbark House

A story of a young Ojibwa girl, Omakayas, living on an island in Lake Superior around 1847. Author Louise Erdrich reverses the narrative perspective used in most children's stories about nineteenth-century Native Americans. Instead of looking out at 'them' as dangers or curiosities, Erdrich, drawing on her family's history, wants to tell about 'us', from the inside. The Birchbark House establishes its own ground, in the vicinity of Laura Ingalls Wilder's 'Little House' books.

Do All Indians Live in Tipis? Second Edition

How much do you really know about totem poles, tipis, and Tonto? There are hundreds of Native tribes in the Americas, and there may be thousands of misconceptions about Native customs, culture, and history. In this illustrated guide, experts from Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian debunk common myths and answer frequently asked questions about Native Americans past and present. Readers will discover the truth about everything from kachina dolls to casinos, with answers to nearly 100 questions, including: Did Indians really sell Manhattan for twenty-four dollars worth of beads and trinkets? Are dream catchers an authentic tradition? Do All Indians Live in Tipis? This edition features short essays, mostly Native-authored, that cover a range of topics including identity; origins and histories; clothing, housing, and food; ceremony and ritual; sovereignty; animals and land; language and education; love and marriage; and arts, music, dance, and sports.

The Earth Always Endures

A collection of chants, prayers, and songs which give a vivid insight into the world of Native Americans.

How I Became a Ghost

A Choctaw boy tells the story of his tribe's removal from its Mississippi homeland, and how its exodus to the American West led him to become a ghost — one able to help those left behind.

I Am Not a Number

When Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school, she is confused, frightened and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from despite being told to do otherwise. When she goes home for summer holidays, her parents decide never to send her away again, but where will she hide and what will happen when her parents disobey the law?

I Can Make This Promise

In her debut middle grade novel—inspired by her family's history—author Christine Day tells the story of a girl who uncovers her family's secrets and finds her own Native American identity. All her life, Edie has known that her mom was adopted by a white couple. So, no matter how curious she might be about her Native American heritage, Edie is sure her family doesn't have any answers. Until the day when she and her friends discover a box hidden in the attic—a box full of letters signed "Love, Edith," and photos of a woman who looks just like her. Suddenly, Edie has a flurry of new questions about this woman who shares her name. Could she belong to the Native family that Edie never knew about? But if her mom and dad have kept this secret from her all her life, how can she trust them to tell her the truth now?

In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse

Jimmy McClean is a Lakota boy, though you wouldn't guess it by his name. His mother is Lakota, and his father is half white and half Lakota. Over summer break, Jimmy embarks on a journey with his grandfather, Nyles High Eagle. While on the road, his grandfather tells him the story of Crazy Horse, one of the most important figures in Lakota, and American, history. Expertly intertwining fiction and nonfiction, celebrated Brulé Lakota author Joseph Marshall III chronicles the many heroic deeds of Crazy Horse, especially his taking up arms against the U.S. government. He fiercely fought against encroachments on the territories and way of life of the Lakota people, including leading a war party to victory at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. With Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse was the last of the Lakota to surrender his people to the U.S. Army. Through his grandfather's tales about the famous warrior, Jimmy learns about his Lakota heritage and, ultimately, himself.

Indian No More

When Regina's Umpqua tribe is legally terminated and her family must relocate from Oregon to Los Angeles, she goes on a quest to understand her identity as an Indian despite being so far from home. Regina Petit's family has always been Umpqua, and living on the Grand Ronde Tribe's reservation is all ten-year-old Regina has ever known. But when the federal government enacts a law that says Regina's tribe no longer exists, Regina becomes "Indian no more" overnight—even though she lives with her tribe and practices tribal customs, and even though her ancestors were Indian for countless generations. Now that they've been forced from their homeland, Regina's father signs the family up for the federal Indian Relocation Program and moves them to Los Angeles. For the first time in her life, Regina comes face to face with the viciousness of racism, personally and toward her new friends. Meanwhile, her father believes that if he works hard, their family will be treated just like white Americans. But it's not that easy. It's 1957 during the Civil Rights era, and the family struggles without their tribal community and land. At least Regina has her grandmother, Chich, and her stories. At least they are all together. In this moving middle-grade novel drawing upon Umpqua author Charlene Willing McManis's own tribal history, Regina must find out: Who is Regina Petit? Is she Indian, American, or both? And will she and her family ever be okay?

Two Roads

A boy discovers his Native American heritage in this Depression-era tale of identity and friendship by the author of Code Talker. It's 1932, and twelve-year-old Cal Black and his Pop have been riding the rails for years after losing their farm in the Great Depression. Cal likes being a "knight of the road" with Pop, even if they're broke. But then Pop has to go to Washington, DC—some of his fellow veterans are marching for their government checks, and Pop wants to make sure he gets his due—and Cal can't go with him. So Pop tells Cal something he never knew before: Pop is actually a Creek Indian, which means Cal is too. And Pop has decided to send Cal to a government boarding school for Native Americans in Oklahoma called the Challagi School. At school, the other Creek boys quickly take Cal under their wings. Even in the harsh, miserable conditions of the Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school, he begins to learn about his people's history and heritage. And most of all, he learns how to find strength in a group of friends who have nothing beyond each other.

We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga

The Cherokee community is grateful for blessings and challenges that each season brings. This is modern Native American life as told by an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation. The word otsaliheliga (oh-jah-LEE-hay-lee-gah) is used by members of the Cherokee Nation to express gratitude. Beginning in the fall with the new year and ending in summer, follow a full Cherokee year of celebrations and experiences. Written by a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, this look at one group of Native Americans is appended with a glossary and the complete Cherokee syllabary, originally created by Sequoyah.

Written in Stone

Pearl has always dreamed of hunting whales, just like her father. Of taking to the sea in their eight-man canoe, standing at the prow with a harpoon, and waiting for a whale to lift its barnacle-speckled head as it offers its life for the life of the tribe. But now that can never be. Pearl's father was lost on the last hunt, and the whales hide from the great steam-powered ships carrying harpoon cannons, which harvest not one but dozens of whales from the ocean. With the whales gone, Pearl's people, the Makah, struggle to survive as Pearl searches for ways to preserve their stories and skills.

7th Grade Podcasts

During distance learning, the 7th graders created podcast episodes about a variety of subjects. Here are some examples of their amazing work!

Frances Clifford, "Adoption"

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Parker Hanna, "The Evolution of Women's Rights"

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Alexa Lisher, "Salem Witchcraft Trials"

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Sophie Grace Stevenson, "Peruvian Food"

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Important Links

Research Projects

Library Info

Middle School
Library Hours

Monday-Thursday
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday
8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Libby Molina
Middle School Librarian

Ebooks access

MackinVIA is Sacred Heart's ebook platform. Here you can find all of the ebooks highlighted on the distance learning book lists, as well as many others. The MackinVIA app is available for both Android and Apple devices. Please see this page for more information.

SORA (whether the app or via the browser) is your portal into the Sacred Heart Library e and audio collection of Duke Classics—Unlimited Access!

Free ebooks, grades 5-12. Must access with username (ABDO Secondary) and password (2020)

  • SimplyE with New York Public Library

To use NYPL's e and audiobooks:

  • Download the SimplyE app (it's free!)

If you don't have a library card, you can apply for an e-card once you are in the app. For more information, including download links for iOS and Android versions of the SimplyE app, visit NYPL's e-service landing page.

To access e and audiobooks from Queens Public Library:

  • Download the Libby App (free for iOS or Android)

If you don't have a card from QPL you can apply for an e-card here (you just need to provide an in-state mailing address). These e-cards will give you access to a range of amazing digital resources.

To access e and audiobooks from Brooklyn Public Library:

If you don't have a card from BPL you can apply for an e-card here. Note that if you are currently outside of NY State, you will need someone in-state to fill out the information or you will not be able to get your e-card. Brooklyn's e-cards are good for one year and will give you access to all of the amazing digital resources they offer.